14 2 Wire For Outlets


14/2 wire, also known as NM-B wire, is commonly used for electrical outlets in residential construction. It consists of two insulated wires (a black and a white) and a bare copper ground wire. The wires are encased in a PVC jacket for protection and durability. In this article, we will discuss 14/2 wire in-depth, compare different types of 14/2 wire, and answer some frequently asked questions about using 14/2 wire for outlets.

Types of 14/2 Wire

There are several types of 14/2 wire that are commonly used for residential outlets. These include:

1. Non-metallic sheathed cable (NM-B): This type of wire is the most common and has a PVC coating. It is suitable for use in dry, indoor settings.

2. Armored cable (AC): This type of wire has a metal jacket that provides additional protection against damage. It is often used for exposed or outdoor wiring.

3. Steel-jacketed cable (MC): This type of wire also has a metal jacket, but it is more flexible than AC. It is often used for wiring that needs to bend around corners or obstacles.

4. Grounded metal-clad cable (GMC): This type of wire has a grounded metal jacket and is used in areas with high moisture or potential for damage.

5. Liquid-tight flexible metal conduit (LFMC): This type of wire has a flexible metal conduit that is covered in a liquid-tight coating. It is often used for outdoor wiring that is exposed to moisture.

Comparison of 14/2 Wire

When comparing different types of 14/2 wire, it is important to consider the setting in which they will be used. Some wires are more suitable for indoor use, while others are designed to withstand outdoor conditions or areas with high moisture. Here is a comparison of the different types of 14/2 wire:

NM-B: This wire is the most common and is suitable for use in dry, indoor settings. It is also the most affordable option.

AC: This wire has a metal jacket that provides additional protection against damage. It is often used for exposed or outdoor wiring.

MC: This wire is more flexible than AC but still provides good protection against damage. It is often used for wiring that needs to bend around corners or obstacles.

GMC: This wire has a grounded metal jacket and is used in areas with high moisture or potential for damage.

LFMC: This wire is flexible and covered in a liquid-tight coating. It is often used for outdoor wiring that is exposed to moisture.

FAQs

Q. Can I use 14/2 wire for 20-amp outlets?
A. No, 14/2 wire is only rated for 15 amps. You should use 12/2 wire for 20-amp outlets.

Q. How many outlets can I wire with 14/2 wire?
A. The NEC allows up to 10 outlets on a 15-amp circuit. However, it is recommended to only wire 8-9 outlets per circuit to prevent overloading.

Q. Can I use 14/2 wire for a GFCI outlet?
A. Yes, 14/2 wire can be used for a GFCI outlet. However, it is recommended to use 12/2 wire for GFCI circuits that have multiple outlets.

Q. Can 14/2 wire be used outdoors?
A. While 14/2 wire can be used outdoors in some situations, it is not recommended. For outdoor wiring, it is best to use a wire that is designed for the specific outdoor conditions, such as AC or LFMC.

Q. What is the maximum length of 14/2 wire that can be used?
A. The maximum length of 14/2 wire that can be used depends on several factors, including the load on the circuit, the resistance of the wire, and the quality of the connections. As a rule of thumb, the maximum length for a 15-amp circuit is 50 feet, and the maximum length for a 20-amp circuit is 100 feet.

Conclusion

When it comes to wiring outlets in residential construction, 14/2 wire is a popular choice. There are several types of 14/2 wire to choose from, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. When selecting a wire, it is important to consider the setting in which it will be used and the load on the circuit. By understanding how to use 14/2 wire safely and effectively, you can ensure that your electrical outlets are properly wired and functioning correctly.